Simple Bread with Coconut Oil and Raw Honey

Parmesan and Roasted Garlic Bread with Italian Herb and Cheese Filling 3Earlier this year I was added to a Facebook group that focuses on making sourdough bread.   Members from all over the world share their struggles, successes, finished loafs, and ask an abundant of questions about the process.  The group is full of members who are beginners (like me) and experts, who share beautiful photos of their finished products. Members also share great ideas on what to do with leftover starters or batches that didn’t meet a baker’s expectations, like pizzas, pretzels, bread bowls, and so on.  I enjoy reading the posts and learning from them.  This is the group if you’re interested in joining.  It is public: Sourdough Bread Making.

My friend added me after we had a conversation about what it takes to make sourdough at home from scratch.  It is still a project on my to-do list, however, my friend has already  made plenty of batches and has a starter that works wonderfully.  You can learn her recipe and process here:  The Dor Whey.

The part that I really love about watching people make sourdough bread is seeing how they design their loafs.  I love to draw and create images. So, I would love to take my inspired and creative energy to make beautiful and delicious pieces of art with sourdough bread and then ship them to friends and family as gifts.  Just beautiful and intricate designs to be put on display at the dining table at a party, a function, or an event of sorts.  I would then love to make videos of me creating the designs and upload them onto YouTube so everyone can enjoy the artistry of it all.  THAT WOULD BE SO FUN!!! Until then, it’s on my to-do list.

Southwest Inspired Bread 1
From Simple Bread to  Southwest Inspired Bread. Get the recipe here.

For now, I have made, what I call, a simple bread recipe that can be made from scratch and ready to eat in the same day.  My simple bread recipe is versatile and can be shaped into different designs.  It can also be taken in all sorts of directions as far as flavors just by adding different herbs, spices, and fillings.  This recipe uses coconut oil instead of vegetable oil and honey instead of refined sugar.  Its flavor is simple when it’s plain and, depending on the thickness of the dough after it bakes, it can be crispy on the outside and soft in the middle (especially with bread rolls).  When I use this recipe to make thin crust pizzas/flat breads, it does come out more like a cracker than a soft crust.  So, keep that in mind.

This is a fun recipe to make with your kids, too.  My son, Rayden, who is almost 2 years old, will sit on the kitchen counter and watch me pour in the flour, mix all the wet ingredients together, and then when it is time to knead I’ll hand him a small piece of dough and let him play with it.  Rayden will often try to eat it after he is done playing with it, but, honestly, I’m not worried.  There aren’t any eggs in this recipe or an ingredient that may seem questionable when eaten raw.  Plus, I just love watching him explore and fill his curiosity by playing with foods.  So fun and memorable!  Go ahead and try this simple bread recipe and follow my friend’s, Dor, blog.  I love her perspective on finding quality ingredients to make good food.


Ingredient List
4 cups of All Purpose Flour
4 tablespoons of Coconut Oil
2 teaspoons of Dry Active Yeast
4 tablespoons of Raw Honey
1 teaspoon of Himalayan Pink Salt
1 cup of Warm Water
Side: a coffee cup of Room Temperature Water
Side: 1 cup of reserved All Purpose Flour

Prepare the wet and dry ingredients:

  • Take a small bowl and fill with 1 cup of WARM WATER and DRY ACTIVE YEAST
  • Mix the yeast and water together and let sit for at least 5 minutes
  • Take another small bowl and pour in COCONUT OIL, RAW HONEY, and HIMALAYAN PINK SALT
  • Mix the ingredients together
  • Take a large mixing bowl and fill with ALL PURPOSE FLOUR

Mix the wet and dry ingredients together

  • Gently pour the ingredients from the two smaller bowls into the large mixing bowl
  • Use a spatula, or your hands, to mix the ingredients together
  • Once the wet ingredients have mixed with the flour you will add a tablespoon of the ROOM TEMPERATURE water and mix until all the powdery flour becomes a doughy consistency.
  • Continue to add 1 tablespoon of water at a time and then mix until you reach the doughy consistency
    • The dough will be a bit wet, but able to hold itself together

Get ready for your first round (out of 2) of kneading:

  • Use a handful of the RESERVED FLOUR and spread over a flat clean surface
  • Place the bread dough on top of the flour and knead
  • You will knead the dough until it is no longer a wet dough – in other words, it should not be sticking to your fingers
    • If the dough is too wet add a small handful of the RESERVED FLOUR on the wet spot and knead to incorporate the flour
  • You can stop kneading when the dough is able to be stretched and extended without falling or cracking apart
    • Try not to go beyond this point and over knead. This can make the final product very dense and hard.

Prepare for the rising period:

  • When done, take some coconut oil and grease the inside of a mixing bowl
  • Then place the dough into the mixing bowl
  • Cover with saran wrap
  • Let the dough rise in a warm place for 1 hour
    • I will raise the temperature of the oven to at least 100°F before turning it off and then place my dough in there to rise
  • After that hour, take the dough and lightly punch it the center to let air escape
    • You will notice that the dough has gotten moist again
    • You will knead a second time until the final product is back to a dry dough that is extendable, stretchable, and holds its shape.

This dough is diverse and can be used for rolls, sandwich bread, pizza/flat breads, and bread design!

In general, this dough will cook through at 400°F for 18-20 minutes. Enjoy!

 

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